Nut-free Raw Noodles Gado-Gado style

I was yearning for the Indonesian salad ‘gado gado’.  Come to think of it, not the salad itself but rather the sauce this dish is renowned for.  Gado-gado is arguably the Western equivalent of a house salad, available at high end restos or streetside food carts around the nation.  Traditionally consisting of vegetables boiled within an inch of their lives and generously coated with peanut sauce, it’s devoid of any nutrition!  Typical blanched veges range from cabbage, spinach, bean sprouts, carrot and corn.  Toppings are raw sliced cucumber, deep-fried sliced tofu, deep fried tempeh, sliced boiled potatoes and sliced boiled eggs.

My sauce is much thinner than the authentic version, as I didn’t fancy my raw noodles becoming gluggy and limp.

Yep, been on a South East Asian trend lately.  I must be homesick.

beautiful bali

beautiful bali

Nut-free Gado Gado Salad

Raw noodles

1 spiralised zucchini (you could use carrot or beetroot too!)

Sauce

2 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 cup tahini
2 tbs palm sugar
1 tsp sea salt
2 tbs lime juice
1/4 tsp chilli flakes
2 cups hot water

Use a spiraliser to shred zucchini into noodle-like strips.  If you haven’t got one, use a veg peeler – your noodles will be thick a la fettuccine.

In a food processor, blitz all sauce ingredients until a saucey texture is achieved.  Taste and tweak seasonings if necessary.  You won’t use all the sauce in one go.  Store in an airtight jar in the fridge.

Arrange noodles on a plate and pour over as much sauce as you like.

Now… does anyone have any raw pad thai recipes to share?  And I am yet to think of a way to ‘uncook’ Vietnamese fresh spring rolls too.  Any ideas?

Happy Friday everybody, have a great weekend!

gado gado inspired noodles

gado gado inspired noodles

Try a Tantalising Thai-inspired Salad Tonight

With Spring less than 2 weeks away in good ol’ P-town I was craving salad for lunch.  Furthermore, most of Monday (today) has been blessed with mucho quantities of sunshine, fresh breezes and chirping birds.  It makes the first day of the working week just that much more bearable.

This is based on the classic Thai ‘som tum’ salad.  I couldn’t for the life of me find any green papaya so made do with the contents of my veg crisper.

Take it from me – the dressing will take the veggies you use to a whole other level.

Raw Thai Salad

Dressing:

2 red chillies (sliced thinly)
2 garlic cloves (chopped)
4 tbs tamari or nama shoyu
4 tbs lime juice
4 tbs sweetener (I used rapadura sugar)

Salad:

handfuls of sliced purple cabbage, zucchini, fennel, sprouted mung beans
unseasoned cauliflower rice (I had a batch the night before so threw this in there to bulk it up)

NB: Cauliflower rice?  Dead easy.  Blitz chunks of cauliflower in a food processor until crumbly.

To make the dressing put all ingredients in a blender and press ON.  Done!

Serve salad onto plates and drizzle with dressing.  Top with chopped raw nuts or seeds (I used cashew and sunflower seeds).

Bask in the sunshine while eating.  Daydream you’re lazing on a beach in Koh Samui getting massages and sipping cocktails.

P.S.  Want to up the protein content?  Add chunks of tofu or tempeh.

P.P.S.  If you have a low tolerance for heat, remove the seeds or just use one chilli.

Till next time!  Hope you all had a good start to the working week.

tasty thai

tasty thai

 

Cabbage: The Chinese fountain of youth

raw cabbage saladLast week I met food coach Marion Egger.  A food ‘coach’, you say?  What is that?  Well, similar to how a sports coach motivates, advises and trains athletes to improve their performance, a food coach does the same except with food.  They assist clients in maximising their output by changing their input (ie. food intake).

Anyway, I really liked her cabbage salad, and so decided to play around with it.

The phyto-nutrient rich cabbage belongs to the “Brassica” family of vegetables.  Other brassica veges are brussels sprouts, cauliflower, bok choy, kale, Chinese cabbage and broccoli.

I know cabbage is good for you.  I mean, really good for you.  It’s probably one of the most under-rated veges out there. The health benefits are impressive:

  • Nutritious yet low in fat and calories. 100 g of leaves provide just 25 calories.
  • Powerhouse of antioxidants (thiocyanates, indole-3-carbinol, lutein, zea-xanthin, sulforaphane, isothiocyanates) which protect against breast, colon, and prostate cancers and help reduce LDL levels in the blood.  LDL is the “bad cholesterol” peeps, in case you’re wondering.
  • Rich in Vitamin C (61% of RDA per 100g).  Regular consumption of vitamin C-rich foods helps the body develop resistance against infection and free radicals.  Cabbage also contains essential vitamins B-5 (pantothenic acid), B-6 (pyridoxine) and B-1 (thiamin).
  • It also contains minerals potassium, manganese, iron, and magnesium.
  • Provides about 63% of RDA levels of Vitamin-K, which gives you strong healthy bones. In addition, vitamin-K is a known cure for Alzheimer’s as it limits neuronal damage in the brain.

cabbage in the raw

Cabbage and Mushroom Salad

¼-½ head of white or red cabbage (shred finely with a knife)
½ Spanish onion
½ parsnip, thinly sliced
2 handfuls of roughly chopped broccoli
¼ carrot, thinly sliced
½ cup of sesame seeds
Sliced mushrooms

Dressing:
fresh lemon juice or apple cider vinegar
tamari
1 clove of garlic chopped
½ tsp cumin
½ tsp cayenne pepper or chilli powder
EVOO

Mix all ingredients together and marinate for at least 30 mins.

The original recipe called for radish (instead of parsnip) and sunflower seeds (in lieu of sesame seeds).

Hope you like it as much as I do! 🙂